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Is it Safe to Eat Bacon?

Is it Safe to Eat Bacon?

Sadly lots of people assume Harvard's warnings must be valid. Red meat, bacon and other tasty high-fat foods, after all, have long enjoyed reputations as being both delicious and dangerous.

Indeed, the bacon question has been argued for years, now with most non-vegan internet bloggers concluding that bacon's "not so bad" if used to add a bit of flavor and crunchiness to "healthy" foods such as salads and vegetables. Comedian Jim Gaffigan spoofed this on Late Night with Conan O'Brien when he described bits of bacon as "the fairy dust of the foodcommunity" and eating a salad sprinkled with bacon as "panning for gold."

A bit more bacon – even a few strips – sometimes even gets the Food-Police stamp of approval, provided it's a special treat, of course, and not a daily indulgence. But such recommendations usually come complete with a warning to stick with lean bacon, and then cook it so it's firm but not soft. While that last sounds a bit naughty, it's actually anti-fat puritanism — the goal being to render the soft parts into fat that can be poured or patted off.

But what if bacon is actually good for us? What if it actually supports good health and is not a mortal dietary sin after all? What if we can eat all we'd like? Naughty propositions to be sure, but ones the Naughty Nutritionist™ is prepared to argue. And that promise is not just a strip tease!

What You Need to Know about Healthy Fats

Bacon's primary asset is its fat, and that fat— surprise! is primarily monounsaturated. Fifty percent of the fat in bacon is monounsaturated, mostly consisting of oleic acid, the type so valued in olive oil. About three percent of that is palmitoleic acid, a monounsaturate with valuable antimicrobial properties. About 40 percent of bacon fat is saturated, a level that worries fat phobics, but is the reason why bacon fat is relatively stable and unlikely to go rancid under normal storage and cooking conditions. That's important, given the fact that the remaining 10 percent is in the valuable but unstable form of polyunsaturates.7

Pork fat also contains a novel form of phosphatidylcholine that possesses antioxidant activity superior to Vitamin E. This may be one reason why lard and bacon fat are relatively stable and not prone to rancidity from free radicals.8

Bacon fat from pastured pigs also comes replete with fat-soluble vitamin D, provided it's bacon from foraging pigs that romp outdoors in the sun for most of year. Factory-farmed pigs kept indoors and fed rations from soy, casein, corn meal, and other grains, are likely to show low levels of Vitamin D.

Eat to Live Not Live to Eat

Dr. Hesselberg

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